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William Shakespeare : Sonnet 29

When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless1 cries,
And look upon myself, and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featured2 like him, like him with friends possest,
Desiring this man's art3, and that man's scope4,
With what I most enjoy contented least;
Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
Haply I think on thee,  and then my state,
Like to the lark at break of day arising
From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;
	For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings,
	That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)	P. 1609

 
FOOTNOTES
1 in vain; 2 as handsome as; 3 ability; 4 range (of ability)
 

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