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John Donne : The Good-Morrow

I wonder by my troth, what thou, and I
Did, till we lov’d? were we not wean’d till then?
But sucked on countrey pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the seaven sleepers den?1
T’was so; But this, all pleasures fancies bee.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desir’d, and got, t’was but a dreame of thee.

And now good-morrow to our waking soules,
Which watch not one another out of feare;
For love, all love of other sights controules,
And makes one little roome, an every where.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let Maps to other, worlds on worlds have showne,
Let us possesse one world, each hath one, and is one.

My face in thine eye, thine in mine appeares,
And true plain hearts doe in the faces rest,
Where can we finde two better hemispheares
Without sharpe North, without declining West?
What ever dyes, was not mixt equally2;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none doe slacken, none can die. 

John Donne (1572-1631)	P. 1633

 
FOOTNOTES
1refers to the legend of seven Christian youths who were sealed in a cave by the Roman Emperor Decius where they slept for two centuries ; 2medieval belief that death and illness were due to an inbalance in the body’s primary elements
 

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