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Select a poet from the list below to jump directly to their poems.

Matthew Arnold
William Blake
Anne Brontë
Emily Brontë
Robert Browning
George Gordon Byron
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
William Cowper
Emily Dickinson
John Donne
Thomas Hardy
Gerard Manley Hopkins
A. E. Housman
John Keats
Edward Lear
John Milton
Wilfred Owen
William Shakespeare
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Sir Philip Sidney
Jonathan Swift
Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Henry Vaughan
Walt Whitman
Oscar Wilde
William Wordsworth
 
 
 
Matthew Arnold
dover beach
to marguerite—continued
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William Blake
a divine image
a dream
a poison tree
ah! sunflower
holy thursday
my pretty rose tree
night
nurse’s song
spring
the chimney-sweeper
the clod and the pebble
the echoing green
the fly
the garden of love
the lily
the schoolboy
the shepherd
the sick rose
the tiger
to the evening star
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Anne Brontë
home
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Emily Brontë
hope
no coward soul is mine
remembrance
the old stoic
the philosopher
to imagination
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Robert Browning
home thoughts from abroad
my last duchess
the bishop orders his tomb at saint praxed's church
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George Gordon Byron
from childe harold’s pilgrimage — canto iv
she walks in beauty
so we’ll go no more a-roving
stanzas for music
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
frost at midnight
kubla khan
the rime of the ancient mariner
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William Cowper
light shining out of darkness
lines written during a period of insanity
the castaway
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Emily Dickinson
a clock stopped—not the mantel’s
a narrow fellow in the grass
an everywhere of silver
because i could not stop for death
hope is the thing with feathers
i felt a funeral in my brain
i heard a fly buzz when i died
i never saw a moor
i years had been from home
it is an honorable thought
like trains of cars on tracks of plush
one need not be a chamber to be haunted
the heart asks pleasure first
the journey
there’s a certain slant of light
wild nights! wild nights!
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John Donne
a feaver
a hymne to god the father
a nocturnall upon saint lucies day
a valediction of weeping
a valediction: forbidding mourning
at the round earths imagin'd corners
batter my heart
confined love
loves alchymie
loves growth
oh my black soule!
song
song(2)
the anniversarie
the canonization
the extasie1
the flea
the funerall
the good-morrow
the relique
the sunne rising
the triple foole
womans constancy
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Thomas Hardy
afternoon service at mellstock
at castle boterel
beeny cliff
channel firing
during wind and rain
fragment
hap
in the study
in time of “the breaking of nations”
the choirmaster’s burial
the convergence of the twain
the darkling thrush
the dead man walking
the man he killed
the masked face
the oxen
the riddle
the ruined maid
the voice
the voice of things
the weathers
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Gerard Manley Hopkins
as kingfishers catch fire
god's grandeur
pied beauty
spring and fall
that nature is a heraclitean fire and of the comfort of the resurrection
the windhover1
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A. E. Housman
with rue my heart is laden
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John Keats
bright star
la belle dame sans merci
ode on a grecian urn
ode on melancholy
ode to a nightingale
ode to psyche
on first looking into chapman's homer
on the grasshopper and cricket
on the sea
sonnet iv
sonnet vii
sonnet x
the eve of st. agnes
this living hand
to autumn
to my brothers
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Edward Lear
old man in a boat
old man of calcutta
old man of cape horn
old man of dundee
old man of peru
old man of the isles
old man of the nile
old man on a hill
old man with a beard
old person of buda
old person whose habits
the owl and the pussy-cat
young lady of norway
young lady of portugal
young lady whose chin
young lady whose eyes
young lady whose nose
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John Milton
how soon hath time
on shakespeare
sonnet xvii
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Wilfred Owen
anthem for doomed youth
dulce et decorum est
strange meeting
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William Shakespeare
sonnet 116
sonnet 130
sonnet 138
sonnet 18
sonnet 20
sonnet 29
sonnet 55
sonnet 60
sonnet 87
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Percy Bysshe Shelley
a lament
ode to the west wind
ozymandias
stanzas written in dejection near naples
the cloud
time
to night
when the lamp is shattered
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Sir Philip Sidney
astrophil and stella (1)
astrophil and stella (15)
astrophil and stella (20)
astrophil and stella (21)
astrophil and stella (23)
astrophil and stella (3)
astrophil and stella (31)
astrophil and stella (33)
astrophil and stella (39)
astrophil and stella (41)
astrophil and stella (47)
astrophil and stella (48)
astrophil and stella (49)
astrophil and stella (52)
astrophil and stella (63)
astrophil and stella (64)
astrophil and stella (7)
astrophil and stella (71)
astrophil and stella (84)
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Jonathan Swift
a description of the morning
a satirical elegy on the death of a late famous general
on stella's birthday
the day of judgment
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Alfred, Lord Tennyson
break, break, break
crossing the bar
in memoriam a.h.h
mariana
the charge of the light brigade
the eagle
the kraken
the lotos-eaters
ulysses
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Henry Vaughan
the retreat
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Walt Whitman
beat! beat! drums!
on the beach at night
the world below the brine
vigil strange i kept on the field one night
when i heard the learn'd astronomer
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Oscar Wilde
from fantasies décoratives
impression du matin
impressions
la mer
les ballons1
the ballad of reading gaol
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William Wordsworth
a slumber did my spirit seal
composed upon westminister bridge
i travelled among unknown men
i wandered lonely as a cloud
it is a beauteous evening
lucy gray; or, solitude
she dwelt among the untrodden ways
strange fits of passion
surprised by joy
the world is too much with us
three years she grew in sun and shower
tintern abbey
where lies the land?
with ships the sea was sprinkled
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Copyright 2001,
The Portable Poetry Company